The Future of SharePoint Server

I came across an interesting article by Cameron Dwyer. In it he looks at the future of the SharePoint brand. As any SP admin knows, Microsoft has been really pushing the cloud-based technology of the 365 suite, which currently includes a limited version of SharePoint.

I’m still on the fence when it comes to cloud-based technologies. I just have a feeling that it’s too much like a car which can ONLY be repaired at an authorized dealership. I’m old-school IT – I want to be able to pop the hood and change the oil if needed.

At any rate, take a look at Cameron’s post and see what you think – he makes some very valid observations.

Is the SharePoint brand going away?

R.I.P. InfoPath

If you haven’t heard, Microsoft announced a while back that InfoPath was going away. We’re 2/3 of the way through the year so far, and still no concrete word on what will replace it, or even if we’ll be able to migrate existing InfoPath forms. John Liu has collected some good links regarding the fiasco on his blog at the link below.

http://johnliu.net/blog/2014/2/1/infopaths-future-and-what-everyones-saying.html

Personally, I think Microsoft is shooting themselves in the foot here. They’ve spent years trying to convince people to use InfoPath for electronic forms, and now that it’s finally somewhat mainstream, they’re pulling the plug with no clear replacement in sight yet. Unless they come out with something outstanding that migrates well, I have a feeling that a lot of clients will be hanging onto SharePoint 2010 or 2013 a lot longer than they would otherwise simply for InfoPath support.

So far it seems like existing InfoPath functionality will be divided up into various Office products like Access & Word, although some functionality is going away for good. We’ll have to wait and see what they’re cooking up, but I’m not optimistic.

 

 

Finding mismatched features after SharePoint migration

I recently performed a migration of a site collection from SharePoint 2007 to SharePoint 2010 using the DocAve migration tool. Afterwards, whenever I tried to access the Site Collection Features or Site Features screen on the 2010 site, I would get the oh-so-helpful error message sporting a correlation ID and not much else. In most cases, the next step would be to find the correlation ID in the ULS logs and troubleshoot accordingly. In this case, however, the correlation ID listed in the error didn’t show up anywhere in the logs. So, after much head-banging and silent cursing, here’s what I came up with: Continue reading